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Mini Pill

Get the mini pill with an online prescription

The mini pill, also referred to as the progestogen-only pill, or 'POP', is an effective oral contraceptive pill. Unlike the combined pill, it contains only progesterone. For that reason, it’s suitable for many women who cannot use combined hormonal contraception (CHC). However, it is still a simple-to-use and effective contraceptive. You can order several mini pill brands online at euroClinix.

Medically reviewed by
Dr. Sarah Donald MRCGP DFSRH DPD DRCOG Written by our editorial team
Last reviewed 07-12-2022

Available Conditions

Box contains 84 film-coated tablets of Cerazette® 75mcg
Cerazette 4.8 (292 Reviews)
    • Active ingredient is desogestrel, which prevents ovulation just like the regular pill
    • Just as effective as combined pills, but doesn't contain artificial oestrogen
    • Can be used by breastfeeding women, women with migraines or those who smoke
More Info
Prices start from £39.99
The Noriday® 350mcg Norethisterone 84 tablets calendar pack
Noriday 4.6
    • A suitable alternative to the combined pill
    • Suitable for women who suffer from migraines, are breastfeeding or smoke
    • Active ingredient norethisterone works in three ways to prevent pregnancy
More Info
Prices start from £32.99

What is the mini pill?

The mini pill is a popular form of hormonal contraception. Unlike combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC), it only contains a synthetic progesterone. Whereas the combined pill, the patch and the ring contain both a synthetic oestrogen and progesterone. Yet, the mini pill is just as effective as the other methods. It is over 99% effective when taken correctly.

There are several brands of mini pill available in the UK that can be split into two main types.

Mini pill types

There are two types of mini pill. They differ in what types of synthetic progesterone they contain and how late you can take them.

  • traditional mini pills (e.g. Noriday or Norgeston) - contain a progestin like norethisterone or levonorgestrel and must be taken no later than 3 hours after your scheduled pill time
  • desogestrel mini pills (e.g. Cerazette or Hana) - contain only the progestin desogestrel and must be taken no later than 12 hours after your scheduled pill time
  • drospirenone mini pills (e.g. Slinda or Slynd) - contain only the progestin drospirenone but, unlike the other types, includes a 4-day break from hormonal pills each month. Should be taken no later than 24 hours after your scheduled pill time

All the types of mini pill work identically and are equally effective.

How does the mini pill work?

The mini pill works by altering hormone levels in your body.

Throughout your menstrual cycle, your reproductive system undergoes various processes to prepare your body for pregnancy. The hormone progesterone is responsible for two critical processes:

  1. It thickens the lining of your womb (uterus) so that a fertilised egg can more easily implant itself.
  2. It thins the lining of the cervix so sperm can more easily enter the womb and fertilise an egg.

The mini pill prevents these processes from occurring by altering your natural progesterone levels. Desogestrel pills can also prevent ovulation, where your ovaries release an egg into the fallopian tube. However, the effect is not as consistent.

What are the benefits of the mini pill?

As well as being a simple and effective contraceptive method, the mini pill has several additional benefits compared to other hormonal contraceptives, such as:

  • can be used soon after giving birth
  • is safe to use whilst breastfeeding
  • safe for women who can’t take oestrogen
  • lower risk of complications and side effects

The mini pill will not prevent you from contracting STIs (sexually transmitted infections). If you need STI protection, use a barrier contraceptive such as a condom.

How do I take the mini pill?

For the mini pill to be effective, take one mini pill each day. Unlike combined methods of contraception, you should not* take a 7-day break for a withdrawal bleed. When you finish a pill strip, immediately start the next set.

The most important part of taking the mini pill is that you must take it at the same each day. Taking a pill too late or missing one could alter its effectiveness.

How late you can take it will depend on the type of mini pill you take. Ask your doctor or read your patient information leaflet if unsure.

*This does not include drospirenone mini-pills as they allow for a 4-day pill-free break.

How do I start the mini pill?

To be protected immediately, start taking the mini pill between the first and fifth days of your period. If you have a shorter menstrual cycle than average, you may need to use barrier contraception for at least 2 days.

If you decide to start your mini pill at any other time, you will not be protected straight away. You will need to use a barrier contraceptive for at least 7 days after to prevent pregnancy.

Can I delay my period with the mini pill?

No. Although some POPs contain the same ingredient as the period delay tablet Norethisterone, you cannot delay your period with the mini pill.

If you need to delay your period, you will need to use period delay tablets or switch to a combined hormonal contraceptive.

What happens if I miss a pill?

This will depend on which mini pill you use.

  • Traditional mini pills have a ‘3-hour window’, meaning you can take them no more than 3 hours late. If it has been more than 3 hours since your scheduled pill time, this should be counted as a missed pill.
  • Desogestrel mini pills have a ‘12-hour window’, meaning you can take them no more than 12 hours late. If it has been more than 12 hours since your scheduled pill time, this should be counted as a missed pill.
  • Drospirenone mini pills have a ‘24-hour window’, meaning you can take them no more than 24 hours late. If it has been more than 24 hours since your scheduled pill time, this should be counted as a missed pill.

Make sure you read the patient information leaflet of your pill for advice on what to do if you miss a pill.

Alternatively, you can use our interactive tool below for advice on what to do if you miss one or multiple pills in one month. Simply click to begin.

Use our interactive tool below on what to do if you miss one or multiple pills in one month (menstrual cycle). Simply click to begin.

Missed contraception, what should I do?

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and follow-up.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the pack as normal.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the pack as normal.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill and take the active (21) pills as per the normal schedule.

2) Skip the pill-free break.

3) Start the new pill pack straight away.

If your pill pack contains 21 tablets, your 4th week should be a pill-free week if you have not chosen to skip it. This means you should still be fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and follow-up.

The combined pill may not be as effective. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal. You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex for the following 7 days.

If you vomited within 3-4 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 24 hours before your usual pill time. As long as you are not sick again, you should still be protected against pregnancy. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and follow-up.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the pack as normal.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the pack as normal.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill and take the active (21) pills as per normal schedule.

2) Skip the inactive (placebo) pills / the pill-free break.

3) Start the new pill pack straight away.

If you missed an inactive pill (placebo), in the 4th week of your cycle, you will still be protected from pregnancy.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and follow-up.

The combined pill may not be as effective. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal. You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex for the following 7 days.

If you vomited within 3-4 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 24 hours before your usual pill time. As long as you are not sick again, you should still be protected against pregnancy. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

The combined pill may not be as effective. If intercourse took place in the week prior, the possibility of a pregnancy should be considered. Contact a doctor for advice and consider using an emergency contraceptive method.

You should keep these key points about taking this pill in mind:

1) The more 'white active tablets' are missed and the closer the missed tablets are to the 4 yellow placebo tablets, the higher the risk of pregnancy.

2) 7 days of uninterrupted 'active tablet'-taking are required to attain adequate protection against pregnancy. If you have trouble remembering to take your pill consistently, you should speak to your doctor for advice.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the pack as normal.

Provided you have only missed one pill and taken the pills correctly the week prior, you should still be protected against pregnancy.

You should:

1) Take the missed pill or start a new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal. You may need to take two pills in one day.

If you have missed more than 1 tablet or have not taken the pills consistently the week pior, you should use a barrier contraceptive method for the following 7 days.

If you have missed a pill in the last week of active tablets, the risk of pregnancy is higher. You should still be protected if you have taken the active pills uninterrupted the 7 days before and you take the following advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal. You may need to take two pills in one day.

If you have missed more than 1 tablet or have not taken the pills consistently the week prior, you should use a barrier contraceptive method for the following 7 days.

If you missed one of the last 4 pills of the pill pack, it should have no impact as these are hormone-free pills. You should:

1) Dispose of the missed pill and take the next scheduled pill at the correct time, ensuring you don't go longer than 4 days before you start a new pack with active pills.

2) You can also start a new pill pack straight away. This changes the first day of your cycle.

If you had sex the week before missing your pill, you may be at risk of pregnancy. Contact your doctor for advice and consider using an emergency contraceptive method. You should also follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal. You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

The combined pill may not be as effective. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal. You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

If you vomited within 3-4 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 24 hours before your usual pill time. As long as you are not sick again, you should still be protected against pregnancy. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

You should still be protected against pregnancy if you experienced a few episodes of diarrhoea in a day/for less than 24 hours. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule. Speak to your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and follow-up.

The protection against pregnancy will not be reduced if it has been less 12 hours. But, you should still take the following advice to ensure protection:

1) Take the tablet as soon as you remember.

2) Then take the next tablets at the usual time.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and follow-up.

The protection against pregnancy will be reduced. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 9 days.

The protection against pregnancy may be reduced. For multiphasic pills, the advice on missed pills will depend on where in the cycle you are, and on which pill brand you are taking. Follow the advice below:

1) Always familiarise yourself with the instructions in the patient information leaflet (PIL) that comes with your pill packs.

2) Take note of when in your cycle you missed your pill - the advice will differ based on this.

  • 2.1 At the beginning of your cycle you should take the missed pill and continue taking the pill as per the normal schedule. You should use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex the following 9 days to ensure protection against pregnancy.
  • 2.2 If the missed pill was towards the end of your cycle you may be advised to skip the pill and start a new cycle (take the 1st pill of a new pill pack).

If you forget to take an inactive/placebo pill (the last pills in the pill pack), you do not need to take them later, as they do not contain active substances. But you should throw away the white tablet(s) you forgot to take, so that you do not prolong the period of inactive tablets. Prolongation may increase the risk of pregnancy. Continue to take the next tablet at the usual time. This is only relevant if you are taking a multiphasic pill with 28 pills (not 21).

If you vomited within 3 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 24 hours after your normal pill time. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

If you are less than 12 hours late, take the missed tablet as soon as possible, even if this means taking 2 tablets on the same day. This will ensure that contraceptive protection is maintained.

If you have missed a pill in the first week of your cycle, you should:

1) Take the last missed tablet as soon as possible and then continue to take the rest of the tablets in the normal manner.

2) Use extra contraceptive protection, such as a condom, or refrain from sex, for the next 7 days.

3) If you had sex in that 1st week (without additional contraception), you could become pregnant. Contact your doctor for advice as soon as possible. They may recommend you use emergency contraception. You should still continue taking your pill as normal.

If you are late by more than 12 hours, take the last missed tablet as soon as possible and then continue to take the rest of the tablets in the normal manner. In addition, use extra contraceptive protection, such as a condom for the next 7 days.

If you have fewer than seven tablets in your blister strip after you have missed taking a dose, you should:

1) Complete the blister strip and start the next blister strip without a break.

This will give you protection from when you took the last missed tablet. You may not have a period until the end of two blister strips, but this will not harm you. You may also have some bleeding on days when you take the tablets.

If you vomited within 3 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 24 hours after your normal pill time. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancies. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you have missed more than one pill, you should:

1) Take the most recently missed pill and skip any previously missed pills.

2) Take your next pills as normal (this could mean taking two pills in one day)

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

4) If you had sex in that 1st week (without additional contraception), you could become pregnant. Contact your doctor for advice as soon as possible. They may recommend you use emergency contraception. You should still continue taking your pill as normal.

If you have missed more than one pill, you should:

1) Take the most recent missed pill (skip any previously missed pills)

2) Take your next pills as normal (this could mean taking two pills in one day)

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

If you missed a pill and have less than 7 pills left of your pack, you should:

1) Take the most recent missed pill (skip any previously missed pills)

2) Take your next pills as normal (this could mean taking two pills in one day)

3) When you finish the strip of pills, start the next strip the next day without a break.

4) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

5) If you do not have a withdrawal bleed after you have finished the second strip, do a pregnancy test before starting another strip.

The desogestrel pill may not be as effective. The more pills you forget to take, the less effective your contraception is. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 2 days.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can (as long as it is taken within 12 hours of your normal time).

2) Continue the pack as normal.

The desogestrel pill may not be as effective. The more pills you forget to take, the less effective your contraception is. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 2 days.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and consider using an emergency contraceptive. Please note you should continue taking the pill as normal if you have used emergency contraception.

The desogestrel pill may not be as effective. The more pills you forget to take, the less effective your contraception is. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 2 days.

If you vomited within 3 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 12 hours after your normal pill time. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the mini pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

Your contraception may not be as effective. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the last missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 2 days.

You will not be protected against pregnancy if you have missed more than 2 pills. Unless a pregnancy can be ruled out, you should stop taking it until it can be confirmed (e.g. from a pregnancy test). If pregnancy can be ruled out, follow the advice below:

1) Continue taking the pill where you left off (or start a new pill pack).

2) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 2 days.

3) After seven days of taking the pill at a regular time, you will be protected again.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the pill as soon as you can (no later than 3 hours from your normal time)

2) Continue the pack as normal.

Your contraception may not be as effective. The more pills you forget to take, the less effective your contraception is. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 2 days.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and consider using an emergency contraceptive. Please note you should continue taking the pill as normal if you have used emergency contraception.

Your contraception may not be as effective. The more pills you forget to take, the less effective your contraception is. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 2 days.

If you vomited within 2 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 3 hours after your normal pill time. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the mini pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

Your contraception may not be as effective. You should follow the below advice:

1) The more pills you have missed, the more the effect against pregnancy is reduced.

2) Take the last missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

3) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

4) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

5) If this happened in the 1st week of the cycle (one or more of the first 7 pills), and you had sex the week before, you may be pregnant. Speak to your doctor for advice.

You are still fully protected, as long as you:

1) Take the pill as soon as you can (no later than 24 hours from your normal time).

2) Continue the pack as normal.

Your contraception may not be as effective. The more pills you forget to take, the more the effecicacy reduced. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

You should still be protected against pregnancy as long as you:

1) Take the missed pill and take the rest of the active pills as per normal schedule (24 pills).

2) Skip the 4 inactive (placebo) pills and start the new pill pack straight away.

You will now have a different start day of your cycle.

If you missed one of the last 4 pills of the pill pack it should have no impact (as these are hormone-free pills). You should:

1) Dispose of the missed pill and take the next scheduled pill at the correct time.

2) Be aware that only a specific type of mini pill brands contain inactive pills, and these should be clearly indicated and have a different colour to the rest of the pills (containing hormones). The instructions will be different if you have missed an active pill.

You may be at risk of pregnancy. Please see your own doctor for advice and follow-up. They may suggest you use a form of emergency contraception. You can continue taking your pills as normal if you have used an emergency contraception. You should also use a barrier method (such as a condom) if you have sex over the next 7 days.

Your contraception may not be as effective. The more pills you forget to take, the more the effecicacy reduced. You should follow the below advice:

1) Take the missed pill or start the new pill pack as soon as you can.

2) Continue the rest of the pack as normal (at your normal time). You may need to take two pills in one day.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following 7 days.

If you vomited within 3-4 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill no longer than 24 hours after your normal pill time. If you are sick again or you do not take a new pill, your contraception will not be effective. If that is the case, retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you experienced severe diarrhoea within 3 hours of taking the pill, you should take a new pill as soon as you can, and after no longer than 24 hours than your normal pill time. As long as you are feeling better and do not continue having diarrhoea, you should still be protected against pregnancy.

If you had severe diarrhoea within 3-4 hours of taking your pill and you have not taken a new one (within 24 hours of the normal pill time), or continue to have diarrhoea, you may not be protected. Retake this quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

You should still be protected against pregnancy. Take your next pill as per your usual schedule.

If you have had severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, the pill may not have been fully absorbed and therefore may not be as effective. You should treat every 24 hours of severe diarrhoea as a missed pill. Retake the quiz and follow the advice for a missed pill.

On rare occasions, the contraceptive vaginal ring can break. Vaginal damage has been reported in connection with the ring breaking. If you discover that your ring has broken, follow the below advice:

1) Dispose of that ring and insert a new ring as soon as possible.

2) Use additional contraception (eg a male condom) for the next 7 days.

3) Contact your doctor if you had intercourse before you discovered that the ring was broken.

If you are being sick (vomiting) or have diarrhoea, the contraceptive ring is still effective (unlike when you are taking the pill).

If you are being sick (vomiting) or have diarrhoea, the contraceptive ring is still effective (unlike when you are taking the pill).

If your ring-free break was no longer than 7 days, you are still protected from pregnancy. You should follow the below advice:

1) Put the new ring in as soon as possible (at your normal insertion time)

2) Replace the ring as per your normal schedule (1 ring should be replaced every seven days, at the same time)

If the ring-free break was longer than 7 days, you may not be protected against pregnancy. The longer the ring-free break lasts, the higher the risk of becoming pregnant. Follow the below advice:

1) Insert a new ring as soon as you remember.

2) Use additional contraception (such as a male condom) if you have intercourse in the next 7 days.

3) If you had intercourse during the ring-free break, there is a possibility that you could be pregnant. Talk to your doctor immediately and consider using a form of emergency contraception.

If the ring has been out of the vagina for less than 3 hours, it will still protect you from pregnancy. You should follow the below advice:

1) Wash the ring in cold or lukewarm water (do not use hot water).

2) Put the ring back in as soon as possible.

3) Replace the ring as per your normal schedule (1 ring should be replaced every seven days, at the same time).

You may not be protected against pregnancy. Take a pregnancy test and consult a doctor before inserting a new ring.

If the ring has been out of the vagina for more than 3 hours, you may not be protected against pregnancy. You should:

1) Wash the ring in cold or lukewarm water (do not use hot water)

2) Reinsert the ring into the vagina as soon as you remember, and leave the ring in place without interruption for at least 7 days.

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following seven days.

4) If you are in your 1st week and you had intercourse in the previous 7 days, there is a possibility that you could be pregnant. In this case, you must contact your doctor.

You may not be protected against pregnancy. You should dispose of that ring and choose one of the following two possibilities:

1) Insert a new ring immediately.

2) This will start the next 3-week period with the ring.

3) You may not have a period, but breakthrough bleeding and spotting may occur.

OR

1) Do not insert a new ring.

2) Have a period first and insert a new ring no later than 7 days from the time the previous ring was removed or fell out.

3) You should only choose this option if you have used NuvaRing continuously for the last 7 days.

If you are being sick (vomiting) or have diarrhoea, the contraceptive patch is still effective (unlike when you are taking the pill).

If you are being sick (vomiting) or have diarrhoea, the contraceptive patch is still effective (unlike when you are taking the pill).

Follow the below advice to ensure you are still protected:

1) Try to attach it again or put on a new transdermal patch immediately (so it has been off for less than 24 hours).

2) Use a new patch if the other one is no longer sticky, has stuck together or to something or if it's fallen off before (do not attempt to use tape or wraps to stick the old one back on).

3) Your "patch change day" must remain unchanged.

The patch may not be as effective. The longer you have been without the patch, the less effective your contraception will be. You should follow the advice below:

1) Immediately start a new 4-week cycle by applying a new transdermal patch.

2) You now have a new day 1 and a new "patch change day".

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following seven days (the 1st week of the new cycle).

The patch may not be as effective. The longer you have been without the patch, the less effective your contraception will be. You should follow the advice below:

1) Immediately start a new 4-week cycle by applying a new transdermal patch.

2) You now have a new day 1 and a new "patch change day".

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following seven days (the 1st week of the new cycle).

Follow the below advice to ensure you are still protected:

1) Try to attach it again or put on a new transdermal patch immediately (so it has been off for less than 24 hours).

2) Use a new patch if the other one is no longer sticky, has stuck together or to something or if it's fallen off before (do not attempt to use tape or wraps to stick the old one back on).

3) Your "patch change day" must remain unchanged.

The patch may not be as effective. The longer you have been without the patch, the less effective your contraception will be. You should follow the advice below:

1) Immediately start a new 4-week cycle by applying a new transdermal patch.

2) You now have a new day 1 and a new "patch change day".

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following seven days (the 1st week of the new cycle).

The patch may not be as effective. The longer you have been without the patch, the less effective your contraception will be. You should follow the advice below:

1) Immediately start a new 4-week cycle by applying a new transdermal patch.

2) You now have a new day 1 and a new "patch change day".

3) Use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following seven days (the 1st week of the new cycle).

If you forget to put on the transdermal patch in your cycle's 1st week, you may have a particularly high risk of becoming pregnant. Follow the advice below:

1) You must use additional non-hormonal contraception for one week (seven days).

2) Put on the first patch of the new cycle as soon as you remember.

3) You now have a new day 1 and a new "patch change day".

If you are on the 4th week of the cycle, you should still be protected against pregnancies. If you left the patch on for too long (forgot to remove it), take it off as soon as you remember. Follow the below advice to stay protected:

1) Start the next cycle on the usual "patch change day", the day after day 28.

2) Continue replacing them weekly, on the same day at the same time.

3) There is no need for additional contraception.

You should still be protected, provided you follow the below advice:

1) Attach a new patch as soon as you remember (within 48 hours).

2) Replace the following patch on the usual "patch change day".

3) No additional contraception is necessary.

If you forget to change the patch for more than 2 days, you can become pregnant. The longer you have been without the patch, the lower the effectiveness will be. You should follow the advice below:

1) Immediately start a new 4-week cycle by applying a new patch.

2) You now have a new day 1 and a new "patch change day".

3) You must use a barrier contraceptive method if you have sex, for the following seven days (1st week of cycle).

Vomiting and diarrhoea

Vomiting or experiencing diarrhoea soon after taking the mini pill should often be considered a missed pill. It could mean your body hasn’t absorbed the pill properly.

If you vomit (are sick) within 2-3 hours of taking the mini pill, take another pill within the right time window, depending on your pill. Otherwise, you will not be protected. If you vomit more than 3 hours after taking the mini pill, you will still be protected.

If you have severe diarrhoea for more than 24 hours, your contraception will be affected. Treat every 24 hours of diarrhoea as a missed pill.

Who can and can’t take the mini pill?

The mini pill is suitable for most women. If you present no risk factors, you can take it right up until menopause.

However, some women may be more at risk of complications and therefore it may not be suitable for them to take it.

Consult your doctor if you have

  • any unexplained vaginal bleeding
  • severe heart or liver problems
  • had breast cancer
  • had a blood clot
  • high blood pressure (hypertension)

Speak to your healthcare provider if you’re unsure whether these apply to you.

Can I take it while breastfeeding?

Yes, the mini pill is considered safe to use after giving birth and whilst breastfeeding. You can start taking it between days 1 and 21 after giving birth and you will still be protected. Any time after that, you will need to use barrier contraception such as condoms for at least 2 days.

Does the mini pill react with other medicines?

When starting a new treatment, you must be aware of how they can interact with any medications you might already take.

The following can interfere with the effectiveness of the mini pill:

  • treatments for tuberculosis
  • epilepsy medication
  • certain antibiotics
  • certain anti-fungal treatments
  • St John’s Wort
  • antiviral medicines, including HIV/AIDS treatments
  • antacids for heartburn and indigestion

If you take any of these treatments, you should speak to your doctor about your contraception options.

What side effects can the mini pill cause?

The mini pill can cause some side effects, especially within the first few months of taking it. However, the most common side effects are mild and have no cause for concern.

Some common side effects include:

  • mood swings
  • low libido
  • acne
  • headaches
  • irregular periods or no periods
  • spotting between periods
  • breast pain or changes
  • weight gain

Read your patient information leaflet for all the possible side effects.

Serious side effects when using the mini pill are rare. However, if you experience any worrying side effects, please consult your doctor as soon as possible.

Can I get the mini pill online?

You can order your mini pill online here at euroClinix. If you’re a first-time user, you can also be prescribed the mini pill Cerazette (Desogestrel) online. All you need to do is complete a quick online consultation which will be reviewed by one of our doctors. Once they have approved your prescription, your pill will be dispatched discreetly to your address with free next-day delivery.

  • Select
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  • Fill out a short
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  • Doctor issues
    prescription

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